Massage Therapy FAQ

What should I expect for my first visit?
For your first visit, you will fill out a health history form to inform me of any medical issues that I needs to be aware of. From this sheet, we will talk about your goals for your massage and the best way to approach them. All information is kept confidential.

It is important to list all health concerns and medications so the therapist can adapt the session to your specific needs without doing any harm. It is also important to list any allergies so the therapist is aware if he/she needs to use a different oil or lotion during the session

Do I have to be completely undressed?
You should undress to the level you are comfortable. For a full body massage, most get completely undressed. However, if you will be more comfortable during the session if you leave your underwear on, that’s fine. The therapist will work around the clothes you left on as best as he/she can. If removing all your clothes makes you too nervous and unable to relax, then you are not getting the optimal benefit from the session.

Your massage therapist will give you privacy to undress and get comfortable on the table. During the massage you will be covered by a sheet, only the areas being worked will be undraped, and then redraped after the therapist is finished

Do I have to be covered during the massage?
Louisiana state law states that during a massage the client must have genitals, breast tissue, and gluteal cleavage covered by a sheet or towel. Each therapist has their own style of draping. This is important to use for your comfort and theirs.

What do I do during a massage treatment?
Make yourself comfortable. If your therapist wants you to adjust your position, she/he will either move you or will ask you to move what is needed. Otherwise, change your position anytime to make yourself more comfortable.

Many people close their eyes and relax completely during a session; others prefer to talk. It’s up to you. It is your massage, and whatever feels natural to you is the best way to relax. Do not hesitate to ask questions at any time.

Will the massage hurt?
This depends on the type of massage and the depth of the strokes. A light, relaxing massage that doesn’t probe very deep into the muscles, shouldn’t hurt. With that being said, there is a ‘feels good’ hurt and an ‘ouch, stop it’ hurt. A good massage, even a really deep tissue massage, should always stay in the ‘feels good’ hurt range.

Pain can be an indication that the muscle is possibly injured or inflamed and pressure should be adjusted. Also, pain can cause you to tighten up and negate the relaxing effects of the massage. The most effective and deepest massage always works with your body’s natural response, not against it.

How long of a massage session should I schedule?
This depends on your needs. Some people schedule a quick 30 minute session to focus on one or two areas that need a little tlc. If you are wanting a full body massage then 60 or 90 minutes is recommended. If you have an injury you would like to focus on, 60 minutes can be used just to work on the specific area, 90 minutes gives enough time for specific treatment and full body massage. These are general rules of thumb and should be discussed as far as what is best for you.

Do I have to listen to whale calls or flutes during my massage?
No. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)
While many therapists play slower, quieter, ‘new age’ type music, you can choose to have different music or no music at all. Studies have shown that music at under 60 beats-per-minute has a calming, relaxing effect on the body and therefore can enhance your experience.

However, while this may be true, any music you like to listen to while you relax can be listened to while you get a massage. If it relaxes you and you enjoy it at home, why wouldn’t it do the same during your treatment? A music player with many choices is used so you can request what you like.

How will I feel after my massage treatment?
Most people feel very relaxed. Some experience a significant decrease or freedom from long-term aches and pains. Many feel a little slowed down for a short period and then notice an increase of energy, heightened awareness and increased productivity which can last for days.

If you received a deep massage, you may be slightly sore the next day – much like a good workout at the gym. Sometimes a hot shower, or a soak in the tub can ease this soreness.

After your session you should increase your water intake a bit. Just a glass or two more than normal is usually fine. This helps keep your body’s tissues hydrated and healthy.

How many sessions will I need?
Honestly, its hard to say. Every person is unique and every condition is unique to each person. It may take one session or it may take several. You and your therapist will be able to talk more specifically about this after your first session and he/she has had a chance to evaluate your body’s tissues.

When should I not get a massage?
In my opinion there are few conditions which would prevent you from enjoying massage. You should not book a massage if you have a fever, cold/flu, or contagious skin infection. If you are pregnant it is advised to wait until the second trimester.

There are many other conditions in which your therapist may need to adapt his/her techniques (i.e. arthritis or osteoporosis) or avoid an area completely (i.e. cuts or burns). With some conditions it is a good idea to get an approval from your physician before you receive massage (cancer, certain heart conditions). This doesn’t mean you can’t get massage. But its always better to err on the side of caution.

Your therapist can advise you about your specific needs.